A new twist on fusion power could help bring limitless clean energy…

The superheated plasma inside the fusion reactor is twisted by magnetic fields. 

In a world struggling to kick its addiction to fossil fuels and feed its growing appetite for energy, there’s one technology in development that almost sounds too good to be true: nuclear fusion.

If it works, fusion power offers vast amounts of clean energy with a near limitless fuel source and virtually zero carbon emissions. That’s if it works. But there are teams of researchers around the world and billions of dollars being spent on making sure it does.

In February last year a new chapter of fusion energy research commenced with the formal opening of Wendelstein 7-X. This is an experimental €1 billion (A$1.4bn) fusion reactor built in Greifswald, Germany, to test a reactor design called a stellarator.

It is planned that by around 2021 it will be able to operate for up to 30 minutes duration, which would be a record for a fusion reactor. This is an important step en-route to demonstrating an essential feature of a future fusion power plant: continuous operation.

But the W-7X isn’t the only fusion game in town. In southern France ITER is being built, a $US20 billion (A$26.7bn) experimental fusion reactor that uses a different design called a tokamak. However, even though the W-7X and ITER employ different designs, the two projects complement each other, and innovations in one are likely to translate to an eventual working nuclear fusion power plant.

Twists and turns

Fusion energy seeks to replicate the reaction that powers our Sun, where two very light atoms, such as hydrogen or helium, are fused together. The resulting fused atom ends up slightly lighter than the original two atoms, and the difference in mass is converted to energy according to Einstein’s formula E=mc².

Here you can see the twist in the plasma within a tokamak. CCFE

The difficulty comes in encouraging the two atoms to fuse, which requires them to be heated to millions of degrees Celsius. Containing such a superheated fuel is no easy feat, so it’s turned into a hot ionised gas – a plasma – which can be contained within a magnetic field so it doesn’t actually touch the inside of the reactor.

Read more:

https://theconversation.com/a-new-twist-on-fusion-power-could-help-bring-limitless-clean-energy-70324https://theconversation.com/a-new-twist-on-fusion-power-could-help-bring-limitless-clean-energy-70324

Advertisements

2 responses to “A new twist on fusion power could help bring limitless clean energy…

  1. ♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪ Singing Your Praises for all you do Because Youre Awsome ♪(・o・)♪ this #ThankfulThursday ♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪ Thank You for your Kind Support !

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s